Newtown Public School students,  in their vegetable patch, have benefited from the program. Picture: Chris Pavlich
Newtown Public School students, in their vegetable patch, have benefited from the program. Picture: Chris Pavlich

How plastic bag ban is changing lives

THE controversial plastic bag ban at Coles and Woolworths might have caused uproar across Australia but it is about to pay off for schools around the country who will benefit from more than half a million dollars made from the movement.

Earlier this year, supermarket heavyweights Coles and Woolworths both decided to scrap free plastic bags from all stores, instead selling thicker, reusable plastic bags for 15 cents each, as well as their 99c green bags.

While the move was praised by environmentalists, it also sparked widespread backlash among shoppers who didn't want to pay for formerly free item, or struggled to remember to bring their own bags from home.

The money made from the 99c ‘Bags for good’ green bags will go towards schools.
The money made from the 99c ‘Bags for good’ green bags will go towards schools.

But their dollars are contributing to a worthwhile cause, with applications now open for the first round of the Woolworths Junior Landcare Grants program.

The money made from the 99c 'Bags for good' green bags will go toward the program, which aims to help kids be more hands-on with gardening and recycling projects.

Woolworths said it had removed approximately 615 million single use plastic bags from circulation in the last four months as a result of the bag ban, and expressed the importance of encouraging youth to take care of the environment.

"On average, each individual Woolworths shopper has contributed to removing 80 single-use plastic bags from our environment - this is a fantastic effort and is something that we

should all be proud of," said Woolworths Supermarkets Managing Director Claire Peters.

 

 

Newtown Public School students,  in their vegetable patch, have benefited from the program. Picture: Chris Pavlich
Newtown Public School students, in their vegetable patch, have benefited from the program. Picture: Chris Pavlich

 

"We are also proud that applications are now open for the Woolworths Junior Landcare Grants program, which has been possible due to the support of our customers who purchased the Woolworths 'Bag for good'.

"It is fantastic to see this money being put back into our communities to help inspire the next generation of environmental champions, this is one of the ways that we are helping to support a greener future for Australia."

The grants program is all about encouraging young people to play an active role in ensuring the safe future of their environment. Picture: Chris Pavlich
The grants program is all about encouraging young people to play an active role in ensuring the safe future of their environment. Picture: Chris Pavlich

The first round of Woolworths Junior Landcare Grants opens today, offering up to 500 $1000 grants to primary schools and early learning centres, making it the biggest national grants program that Junior Landcare has had to date.

"The Woolworths Junior Landcare grants program is all about encouraging young people to play an active role in ensuring the safe future of their environment," Landcare Australia CEO, Dr Shane Norrish said.

"We are pleased to open applications in what will be our biggest ever round of national Junior Landcare grants.

"The program will fund hundreds of worthwhile projects in primary schools and early learning centres and will benefit thousands of children in every Australian State and Territory."

Primary schools and early learning centres can apply at landcareaustralia.org.au/woolworthsgrants. Grant applications close on November 23, 2018 with grants provided in the

new year.


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