News

Where do your clothes come from?

NEW PERSPECTIVE: Jane Milburn wearing a history skirt with a story to tell about how it was created from redundant textiles.
NEW PERSPECTIVE: Jane Milburn wearing a history skirt with a story to tell about how it was created from redundant textiles. contributed

WHERE do your clothes come from? Who makes them? And what happens to them when you throw them out?

These are questions everyone should be asking this Fashion Revolution Day on April 24, according to Jane Milburn.

Ms Milburn started the Slow Clothing manifesto and the website Textile Beat which aims to teach people to think natural, quality and local about our clothes.

It also encourages people to care for, make, adapt, revive and salvage clothes and not to indulge in fast fashion.

These are also the aims of Fashion Revolution Day, held on April 24, which is the anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory collapse in April 2013 in Bangladesh that killed 1133 people.

The day works to honour the fashion factory workers who died and encourages people to ask who makes their clothes.

Ten years ago, Ms Milburn was working for AgForce raising awareness for the slow food movement and making people aware of where their food comes from.

"About four years ago, I had a light bulb moment, that clothing is the next story to be told; everyday we eat and every day we dress. They are essential to our well-being,” she said.

"We need to make choices around what we eat and wear and the effects on our health, the health of others and the health of the planet.”

Ms Milburn is encouraging people to think more about what they wear and how they can be sustainable when in comes to clothes.

"I have nothing to do with the fashion industry, I'm encouraging people to do their own style rather than be a slave to fashion and there many ethical issues going on there,” she said.

Ms Milburn runs workshops teaching people how to fix and mend their own clothes or to make them into something new altogether.

She said the fashion industry often lacked transparency about the amount of waste it produced, and the exploitation of workers.

Ms Milburn said simple steps to having a more sustainable wardrobe include buying a sewing kit and a good pair of scissors, learning to hand sew and repair clothes.

"You put emotion and new life into it when you repair things rather than throwing them out,” she said.

"Think about the time you spend shopping for something new you could be mending something you have.”

Focus on buying local, quality items made from natural fibres as well as buying clothes from op shops and second hand stores.

"Rural town second hand stores have some great bargains,” she said.

"Don't buy something just because it's on sale, think about, how often you would wear it and do you need it?”

For more information about slow clothing go to textilebeat.com

South Burnett

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

$348m worth of work up for grabs at RAAF Amberley build

The EA-18G Growler, an airborne electronic attack aircraft, is capable of providing force level electronic warfare support.

Calling all painters, cleaners, bird proofers and 38 other trades

Woolworths, Coles, Aldi: Why it pays to check docket

Do you know about your supermarket's 'freebie policy'?

RACEWAY ROW: Ipswich Council accused of threats, bullying

Queensland Racing has accused Ipswich City Council of intimidation and bullying in an “self-aggrandising” attempt to take control of Willowbank Raceway.

The council was told the raceway was not for sale.

Local Partners

OPINION: Bachelor really crossed the line

Leah’s abrupt Bachelor exit is slut-shaming at its worst.

Marvel stars tease superhero epic

The four year wait for Marvel's The Defenders is over.

The Defenders stars on their long-awaited superhero team-up.

The two stars who intimidated Chris Hemsworth

Chris Hemsworth was intimidated by two other Hollywood stars.

Thor star says he was ‘weirdly shaken’ when he met two other actors.

Sam Newman: How a Playboy magazine changed everything

The new crew of The Footy Show.Source:Supplied

How a Playboy magazine changed everything.

Leah slams Matty: ‘I was incredibly disappointed’

Leah says she was ‘incredible disappointed’ with Matty J.

BACHELOR evictee's controversial chat with Kyle and Jackie O.

John Eales finds peace with the haka

Inia Maxwell and John Eales in a scene from the documentary John Eales Reveals: The Haka.

Rugby legend is on a quest to learn about a sacred Maori tradition/

The Bachelor recap: Secret pasts publicly exposed

Matty J is left speechless on The Bachelor.

TWO Bachelor contestants’ secret adult pasts have been exposed.

4800 homes to be built in massive new Coast estate

Masterplanned community full steam ahead - it's not Caloundra South

Open for inspection homes August 17 - 23

Check out this weekend's homes open for inspection.

Airbnb, Stayz and co tipped to squeeze Coast housing market

HOLIDAY BOOM: Airbnb letting is putting a further squeeze on long-term rentals.

Councils exploring options to manage the industry

How we got a rental straight away on the Coast

Rita and David Allara, moved down from Townsville, paid three months up front rent to secure the place at flash new unit block in Kings Beach.

Genius move helps secure rental property

Developer tears up couple's contract for new home

Jade and Edward Roberts were stung by the sunset clause on the first day of their honeymoon.

The developer has the right to do this under the sunset clause

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!