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Dangers of logging on in bed

Andrea Dieckmann of Karalee is guilty of using her phone and computer when she is in bed.
Andrea Dieckmann of Karalee is guilty of using her phone and computer when she is in bed. David Nielsen

ONLY five per cent of Australians believe they get enough sleep and never feel tired and for many of them, including Ipswich's burgeoning population, technology could be to blame.

That's just one of the alarming findings from the interim results of a national sleep survey being conducted by Central Queensland University and bed manufacturer Sealy.

The results also show 98% of respondents use some form of technology whilst in bed, whether it be TV, radio, computer, phones or video consoles.

The connection between poor sleep outcomes and technology will need more research before casual links can be established but early results are concerning.

Karalee resident Andrea Dieckmann said technology had definitely had an impact on her sleep pattern in recent years.

When asked if she used her mobile phone while in bed the answer couldn't have been more categorical.

"I do it all the time," she said.

"I spend so much time on it I only get around four hours sleep a night.

"I tend to have a sleep during the day as well now."

The survey has also indicated that most respondents recognize that eight hours is the recommended amount of sleep you need to perform at your best but few actually get that.

Mal Smith from Sleepy's Bedding at West Ipswich said most people cited poor sleep as the reason they were shopping for a new bed.

"A guy came in here a couple of months ago and his eyes were hanging out of his head," Mr Smith said.

"Almost everyone that comes in here complains about a lack of sleep."

Other early results show 19% of people admit to having fallen asleep at work or during a meeting and 26% of respondents have called in sick due to lack of sleep.

The Sealy Sleep Census is open until March 16 with the full report due for publication in early April.

To participate, visit sealysleepcensus.com.au

Topics:  technology


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