The Voice 2015. Tim McCallum from Bellbird Park. ###EMBARGOED UNTIL MONDAY JULY 26### Photo Contributed
The Voice 2015. Tim McCallum from Bellbird Park. ###EMBARGOED UNTIL MONDAY JULY 26### Photo Contributed Contributed

Tim defies odds in The Voice

IPSWICH'S Tim McCallum has become an overnight sensation after wowing crowds and judges during his blind audition on reality television show The Voice.

The 35-year-old Bellbird Park resident, whose episode aired on Sunday night, caught the attention of three out of the four famous judges during his rendition of Nessun Dorma by Giacomo Puccini.

His moving performance turned the chairs of Ricky Martin, Delta Goodrem and the Madden Brothers who all wanted him on their teams.

For Mr McCallum, it was a dream come true.

"I always knew that I was born to sing and perform on the stage," he said.

"Now to be on The Voice and to work with an array of talented judges, it is amazing.

"To be successful in having three chairs turn, that was really exciting for me."

After all three judges presented a convincing case, Mr McCallum chose Ricky Martin as his singing mentor.

"Although the other judges put up a good fight, I couldn't pass up the opportunity of working with Ricky," he said.

"I feel Ricky and I have similar beliefs about music telling a story and creating an emotional journey with people.

"I thought, out of all the judges, he would be the one to take me to the next level to get the most out of my voice."

While his love of music and singing has now propelled him onto the world stage, it hasn't been an easy ride for Mr McCallum.

The talented singer's life changed forever after a horrific accident left him paralysed at the age of 18.

"Prior to my accident, I was in a good place in my life," he said.

"I loved musical theatre and, by the time I was 18, I had already been in 30 theatre performances including Westside Story and Les Miserables.

"I had moved from Geelong, my home town, to Perth where I had been accepted into the Western Australian Academy of Arts.

"That is where stars such as Hugh Jackman had gone to.

"But two days before I was supposed to start, I went to the beach. I dived over a wave and hit my head on a sandbar.

"It was an unlucky dive which resulted in my current condition of quadriplegia.

"Being told that I would never be able to walk again, that was one of the saddest moments in my life."

What would follow would be nine months of rehabilitation and learning how to sing again.

"I thought to myself, I have two options here. I can sit and sulk or I can sit and sing," Mr McCallum said.

"Because singing was what I always wanted to do, I was encouraged to continue listening to music and try to get back into it.

"Doctors said I might not be able to sing like I used to. But here I am today."

Mr McCallum said he hoped to use his story to inspire others to follow their dreams.


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