Police and State Emergency Service volunteers searched Picnic Point in Toowoomba for the body of Mrs Lynch.
Police and State Emergency Service volunteers searched Picnic Point in Toowoomba for the body of Mrs Lynch. Nev Madsen

STOP THIS ANGST: Plea to make killer reveal body sooner

WITH the location of her sister's body still a mystery, former Warwick resident Lyn McMillan couldn't bring herself to turn on the TV to watch a north Queensland family get the closure she longs for.

Sentenced in a landmark 'No Body, No Parole' case last week, an Innisfail man revealed where he left the body of his partner after killing her.

The man said he was motivated by the 'No Body, No Parole' laws that were passed in Queensland last year, making it compulsory for murderers to disclose the location of their victim's body to be eligible for parole.

But Ms McMillan said despite this success, it would take an amendment of the laws to get her sister's convicted killer to confess where her body was.

 

Lyn McMillan and her sister, murder victim Gail Lynch.
Lyn McMillan and her sister, murder victim Gail Lynch. contributed

Killer's dirty secret

"I think that is his dirty little secret that he will take to his grave," she said.

In 2015, Toowoomba man Ian Phillip Hannaford was handed a life sentence after a jury found him guilty of murdering Warwick woman Gail Lynch in 2012.

"He can sit in his jail cell and know where she is while no one else does," Ms Lynch's sister Lyn McMillan said.

Ms McMillan said the knowledge gave the convicted man "power" that was unbearable for her to think about.

But Ms McMillan still holds hope for finding her sister's body.

"I think about it nearly every day.

"We don't have anything to remind us of Gail. We don't have her ashes, we don't have a grave site, we don't have a resting place or a memorial of where she was killed.

"If we have those things it would validate that Gail existed in this world.

"She lived up to 55 years of age and then she fell off the face of the earth and there is nothing."

 

DETERMINED: Gail Lynch's niece Jas McLaren and Lyn McMillan won't give up until they find out what happened to their beloved aunt and sister.
DETERMINED: Gail Lynch's niece Jas McLaren and Lyn McMillan won't give up until they find out what happened to their beloved aunt and sister. Georja Ryan

A flaw in the law

Ms McMillan said said an amendment was needed to make Mr Hannaford come forward with the location of her sister sooner.

It's another nine years before Mr Hannaford is up for parole.

"That means we have to suffer for another nine years. The hard bit is the waiting," Ms McMillan said.

She wants the law amended to give convicted murderers a 12-month grace period in which to reveal the location of the body.

"After that for every year that they don't reveal they should have another year added onto their sentence."

"It is great that it has got this far now but I think they need to tell us long before they are due for parole."

 

Ms McMillan said Warwick, a town she once loved, felt like a strange place since the death of her sister Gail Lynch.
Ms McMillan said Warwick, a town she once loved, felt like a strange place since the death of her sister Gail Lynch. Jonno Colfs

A strange town now

Ms McMillan, who has since moved to Bribie Island, said not knowing where her sisters body was drove her out of a town she loved.

"All the people of Warwick were absolutely beautiful towards me," she said.

"I stayed for 12 months after the court case but it got to a stage of where my life was just going round in circles and I had to leave for my own sanity," she said.

"Everywhere she went, I would think, is (Gail) there."

The idea of putting a plaque in memory of Ms Lynch in a Warwick park has crossed Ms McMillan's mind more than once, but not knowing the location of her body is stopping her.

She hopes her sister would be remembered as a happy, loving person.

"She was good to people that she did know and she lived the life she wanted to live her way."

While Ms McMillan is overjoyed for the Innisfail family, she is still waiting for her day to come.

"I hope this law helps a lot of families that are grieving at the moment," she said.

"I hope this will show the politicians and the police and the judges what the got right and what they got wrong."


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