Revealed: Australia's most dangerous industries

Agriculture is among the most dangerous Australian occupations.
Agriculture is among the most dangerous Australian occupations. Mike Knott

Time on the road is a major factor in how dangerous an occupation is. Road deaths made up 31% of all work-related fatalities in 2014, with freight transport claiming 423 lives and passenger transport killing 31 workers. 

The study defined "serious injuries" as any injury resulting in the worker being unable to work for a week or more. 

Male workers suffered the vast majority of deaths at a total of 176 of the 188 fatalities (94%). Males also recorded 64% of all serious work claims.

It is unclear how significant a part mental health issues play in these statistics.

Here is how the study broke down the most dangerous Australian industries:

1. Agriculture, forestry and fishing


Tobi Loftus


They are the world's oldest industries, but in thousands of years we still haven't been able to make agriculture, forestry and fishing safe. Finder money expert Michelle Hutchison said commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous jobs on the planet. In 2014, 43 people died and 3,365 suffered serious injuries out of the 313,000 total workers.

2. Transport, warehousing and storage


Derek Barry


The sector made up 15% of all worker fatalities in 2013 and 2014. With long hours in trucks, heavy packages and heavy machinery, it should be no surprise transport, warehousing and storage jobs almost topped the list. Of 590,000 workers in these industries, 46 people died and 9,425 people suffered serious injuries in 2014. 

3. Construction



What goes up, must come down. We can only hope the poor soul it comes down on is wearing a hard hat. In 2014, 31 construction workers died and 11,535 suffered serious injury out of 1.026 people in the industry. But despite having double the workers of the transport, warehousing and storage sector, the construction industry saw less fatalities.

4. Manufacturing 



The manufacturing industry saw the second-highest number of injuries in 2014 of the entire Australian workforce. In that year, 15 manufacturing workers died and 12,930 suffered serious injury out of 930,000 workers. 

5. Mining


Tom Huntley GLA161012RIOT


Big machines and big trips to work can create a recipe for disaster. In 2014, ten workers died and 2,670 sustained serious injuries of the 269,000-strong workforce.

6. Arts and recreation services




It is unclear how a job in the arts can be dangerous. As for recreation, well, it's all fun and games until someone loses an eye. Ten people died in 2014, while 1,865 suffered serious injury out of 202,000 total workers. A job in this sector is statistically more likely to cause fatality than mining. 

7. Wholesale trade



In 2014, six wholesale trade workers died and 4,380 suffered serious injury. 

8. Health and community services

Only two health and community service workers died in 2014, but 8,775 were injured of 750,000 workers.

9. Public administration and safety

Irony is cruel. Six public administration and safety workers died in 2014, while 8,775 suffered serious injury of the 750,000-strong workforce. 

10. Administrative and support services

Four workers died and 4,525 were injured of 386,000 workers in 2014. 

Topics:  editors picks injury insurance work

Gympie Times

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Bid to seize greyhound trainer's property rejected

Queensland greyhound trainer Tom Noble

Disgraced greyhound trainer have to rely on welfare

After 'heinous' live baiting, trainer's land cannot be seized

Thomas Adrian Noble outside the supreme court, where a judge threw out the state's bid to seize his Churchable property.

Disgraced trainer relived after state loses bid to take his home

Australians to be hit with shopping tax

Online shopping could soon be that little bit more expensive.

Tax would affect 90 per cent of deliveries

Local Partners