We're likely to see more whales venture into uncommon areas

UPDATE: WE'RE likely to see more adventurous whales entering Fraser Coast waterways they don't usually venture to as the migrating population grows each year.

Whale watching industry pioneer Jill Perry said while she hadn't spotted whales in the Susan River during her 28 years as a whale boat operator, it was becoming more common with sub-adult whales. 

It comes after a spokeswoman from ORRCA Rescue and Research confirmed the group had received information from the public about a sighting of a whale in Susan River. 

The reports have yet to be confirmed, but Ms Perry said whales hadn't been known to previously venture into that river system. 

However, as the population grows, more sub adult whales are venturing into rivers, like the two humpback whales seen swimming in the lower reaches of the Burnett River.

"It is rare but as the population grows more whales will venture into places they don't usually go," Mrs Perry said. 

"They're (sub adults) are a little bit like stupid teenagers," she said. 

Mrs Perry said it was most common for adults this age to enter areas like these out of curiosity. 

She said other reasons whales may end up in rivers and shallows could be that they're sick and looking for somewhere to hide or because they have been kicked out of their pod.  

A whale has been spotted swimming up Bunya Creek at River Heads
A whale has been spotted swimming up Bunya Creek at River Heads Contributed

EARLIER: 

A MARINE rescue organisation is responding to reports a humpback whale was spotted in Susan River.

The Chronicle also received information from the public that a whale had been seen in Bunya Creek in River Heads.

The reports have not been confirmed, but a spokeswoman from ORRCA Rescue and Research said they had 

Pacific Whale Foundation, Hervey Bay whale watching - Sub-adult humpback whales at play.
Pacific Whale Foundation, Hervey Bay whale watching - Sub-adult humpback whales at play. Valerie Horton

received information from the public about a sighting of a whale at Susan River.

<<Keep up to date with the latest whale reports and follow the topic here>>

The Chronicle contacted Peter Lynch from Blue Dolphin whale watching who said he had heard a similar report.

A spokeswoman from the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection said wildlife officers had not received any calls about whales in the Bunya Creek or Susan River area on Sunday.

"As humpback numbers increase, they can turn up in places they may not have been seen for many decades," the spokeswoman said.

"If you do see a whale in a coastal stream or estuary please let it swim freely so it can make its way back to the sea.

"Boaties, jet skiers, paddlers and pilots need to give whales a wide berth - at least 300 metres in the case of jet skis.

"The approach limits are available online at www.ehp.qld.gov.au/factsheets/pdf/wildlife/marine-mammal-proximity-brochure.pdf EHP officers will be monitoring the area."

VIRAL VIDEO: Amazing whale footage not from here

The reports come a week after two humpback whales were spotted in the Burnett River.

Two whales died last week after beaching themselves on Sheridan Flats near Fraser Island.

A whale entangled in a rope was also spotted last month in Fraser Coast waters.

There are estimated to be 30,000 whales migrating this season, double the number recorded four years ago.


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