Fire danger, cyclone warnings, high temps on way for CQ

BEATING THE HEAT: It’s going to be a hot summer. Best place to be is under the water at East Shores (above), or at the pool.
BEATING THE HEAT: It’s going to be a hot summer. Best place to be is under the water at East Shores (above), or at the pool. Mike Richards

ENJOY the cooler weather while it lasts, central Queensland, because according to Brendan Bradford, things are about to heat up.

The Rockhampton Bureau of Meteorology technical officer said the El Nino weather event being observed in Australia was very similar to the summer of 1997-98.

"We are going to have a pretty warm summer," Mr Bradford said.

"We are forecast for above-average day and night temperatures and a drier summer with below-average rainfall.

"There will be less wide spread showers but an increase in severe, isolated thunderstorms with damaging winds and hail."

While average October temperatures varied between a low of 17 degrees and a maximum of 29.6 degrees, Mr Bradford said CQ residents could expect temperatures in the 30s next week.

"Temperatures will reach about 30 in Rocky over the long weekend," Mr Bradford said.

"There will be a high fire danger this weekend with gusty, south-easterly winds.

"But inland temperatures in CQ will start to rise towards the end of next week and should reach the mid-30s by Friday."

As for rain and cyclones, Mr Bradford said CQ was looking pretty dry for now.

"The storms we saw earlier this week have moved off the coast and we're going to have a dry weekend," he said.

"Showers may return next week but they will be mainly on the coast.

"We are preparing to launch a 'get ready' cyclone campaign on October 12 and we will have some idea of cyclone activity after that."

Topics:  el nino fire warning summer

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