‘Outdated’ cars could be dumped in Australia

OFF-the-pace emissions standards in Australia are leaving the door open for car manufacturers and importers to "dump" high-polluting new vehicles in Australia, a Griffith Business School researcher says.

Dr Anna Mortimore says the attention the Volkswagen emissions scandal has brought on the car industry reveals a fail-ure to impose international standards in Australia.

"Australian air pollution and CO2 emissions standards lag well behind EU and US standards," she said.

"While Australia does have air pollution standards, it has no regulatory CO2 emission standards to reduce emissions of greenhouse gas from fossil fuels."

In an article in The Conversation, Dr Mortimore said that since last month all new vehicles sold in the EU must be Euro 6-compliant.

Euro 6 limits bring overall emissions of diesel and petrol vehicles closer to parity.

Dr Mortimore said Australia's air pollutant standards were Euro 4, which were fully implemented by July 2010.

Euro 5 standards will not apply here until November 1 next year and Euro 6 takes effect in 2017 and 2018.

"Importers of new vehicles can dump high-polluting Euro 4 compliant vehicles into Australia, vehicles which cannot be sold in their own country," Dr Mortimore said. "Clearly, government intervention is required to upgrade the emission standards for air pollutants."

Topics:  cars co2 emissions environment

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