ALL HEART: Brassall grandmother Lyndall Schloss, a heart transplant recipient is helping raise awareness for DonateLife Week, which starts on Sunday. Pictured with her husband Russell.
ALL HEART: Brassall grandmother Lyndall Schloss, a heart transplant recipient is helping raise awareness for DonateLife Week, which starts on Sunday. Pictured with her husband Russell.

One thing you can do to help 10 people live

GRANDMOTHER Lyndall Schloss was saved by the generosity of a stranger.

In November 2011, the 65-year-old Brassall woman received a life-saving heart transplant. Mrs Schloss's name had been on the transplant wait list since March 2010.

Her own heart was failing - the result of dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition which enlarges the heart and weakens its ability to pump blood.

In the space of 18 months, while she waited, bed-ridden, Mrs Schloss's Brassall home was flooded in the devastating 2011 flood event and her mum passed away two months before her successful transplant.

She also received four "false alarms" for an available donor organ.

"I had faith that, one, I would get a heart, or two, it was my time to go. I had a peace about that as well. My family knew what my wishes were. Yes, I really wanted a heart but if I didn't, I believed it was God's will that I would not be here," she said.

"They always bring in two people when there is a heart available so if one person turns up and it's not a good match they have someone standing by who may be able to receive that heart.

"So on three occasions the heart went to someone else and another time, by the time I got there, the heart was no longer viable.

"The last time I received the call I thought 'this is it, I think my mum is in heaven and she's pulling some strings'."

Now Mrs Schloss has joined forces with West Moreton Health's Donation Specialist Nurse Wayne Stevens to raise awareness of organ donation for DonateLife Week, 29 July - 5 August.

West Moreton Health's Donation Specialist Nurse Wayne Stevens, who also works in the Intensive Care Unit, said

one person has the potential to save up to 10 lives by becoming a donor upon their death.

"For someone seriously ill, an organ or tissue transplant can mean the difference between life and death, being healthy and sick, between seeing and being blind or between being active and never walking again," Mr Stevens said. "It enables people to resume an active role in their family, workplace and community."

He has encouraged the West Moreton community to discuss organ donation with their family and register their wishes at donatelife.gov.au


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