Beards make it difficult to seal a surgical mask.
Beards make it difficult to seal a surgical mask.

Men with beards issued virus warning

MEN may need to hack off their mutton-chops, void their Van Dykes or part ways with their soul patch if they plan on effectively using a respirator to protect themselves from being infected by the deadly coronavirus.

Newly released information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US said facial hair can interact with protective respiratory devices.

A detailed graphic released by the agency shows the how different types of facial hair can conflict with potentially lifesaving respirators. The information was released in the US as the world tries to respond to the spread of the virus.

 

Some beards can now pose a risk. Picture: NY Post
Some beards can now pose a risk. Picture: NY Post

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Handlebar, walrus, and Zorro moustaches are fine, but the CDC says folks may need to lose their Fu Manchus, Dalis, and Garibaldis because they could prevent respirators from making a seal on wearers' faces.

And while a clean-shaven face is OK, stubble could cause trouble, the agency warned.

Standard beards and chops are also risky, as the hair could come in contact with a respirator's exhalation valve, reducing their effectiveness, the graphic said.

Goatees are good to go - but only if a mask-wearer's chin hair doesn't cross the seal.

This article originally appeared on the New York Post and was reproduced with permission


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