Julia Morris hosts the TV series Blind Date.
Julia Morris hosts the TV series Blind Date.

Julia Morris lights up the screen with flirty singles

IF YOU'RE after a dating show without the drama, then you've got a date with Julia Morris on Monday nights.

The comedian and TV presenter hosts the new version of Blind Date, taking aim as cupid for singles looking for Mr or Ms Right.

Keeping true to the original concept, which first debuted in Australia in the 1960s and went through several reincarnations in the '70s and '90s, the singles will need to use sharp conversation and witty banter to determine which person is very right, or horribly wrong, for them.

"It was great to get back into a studio again and host a show," Morris says.

"While I want every single show in my lifetime to be with my beloved Dr (Chris Brown, my I'm A Celebrity co-host) it was also good fun to do it on my own.

"It was a super fun, funny, sweet, warm adventure.

"It felt like simple TV, not all convoluted and not all that strange editing. These are absolutely normal Aussies who are not used to being on television. I try to bring a warmth and nurturing to that, while at the same time bringing humour. Genuine hearts are getting a go, which is really refreshing."

Singles can't see who they're flirting with on Blind Date.
Singles can't see who they're flirting with on Blind Date. Channel 10

In the modern world of swiping left and right, the show gets back to the basics of dating but with a 21st century twist.

Morris plays matchmaker for singles of all shapes, sizes, ages and sexual preferences including few famous faces like Casey Donovan.

"People in their 20s aren't the only ones in Australia who are single," she says.

"It was an absolute breathe of fresh air that we had such a breadth of different Australians. They range from 18 to 80 and they're from all different walks of life.

"Sometimes I think contestants for (other) shows at the moment are people who seem like they've had media training. They're all super savvy and they know what to say. These are not people looking to launch a website or a business. It genuinely felt like they were looking for love."

So what happens if it isn't love at first sight and the big reveal is a bit awkward?

"If someone had a reaction on their face as if to say 'Ew' or 'Oh God what have I done?' then instantly my instincts turn to making it comfortable for the other person," Morris says.

 

Julia Morris doesn't want anyone to feel outright rejected on her dating show.
Julia Morris doesn't want anyone to feel outright rejected on her dating show. Channel 10

"I didn't want anyone to feel like they were getting properly rejected on my show."

At the end of each episode, Morris catches up with the couples to see how their first date went and if they'd like to see more of each other.

"There are some matches, which is terribly exciting. I would hope I get an invitation if there are any weddings," she says.

"Then there were some where it looked like this could actually be it, and they came down to the studio not long after and it would feel like a different story.

"There were lots of twists and turns, which kept it super fun for me. Just when I knew what I would get out of them, an entirely different thing would come out. There were some absolute clangers and they were surprisingly honest too."

Bind Date airs Mondays at 7.30pm on Ten.


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