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Ipswich mum's plea: 'Talk to your loved ones'

Forner Brothers player Max Bishop, pictured with his family from left, Karlie McKlaren, Cody Masson-McKlaren, Harry Bishop, 5, and parents Mark Bishop and Caroline Masson, received a life-saving liver transplant in 2016.
Forner Brothers player Max Bishop, pictured with his family from left, Karlie McKlaren, Cody Masson-McKlaren, Harry Bishop, 5, and parents Mark Bishop and Caroline Masson, received a life-saving liver transplant in 2016. David Nielsen

IT'S A conversation all families need to have and later this month it will be put in the spotlight.

Ipswich residents are being asked to talk to their loved ones about organ donation during DonateLife Week.

More than 1400 Australians and their families, just like that of 11-year-old Ipswich boy Max Bishop, are waiting for a life-saving transplant.

Since the family's ordeal, Max's mum Caroline said they have all added their names to the Australian Organ Donor Register.

"Because families are in grief they often don't end up donating," she said.

"Talk to your family, let them know that organ donation is really what you want and help save other people's lives."

Her message to Aussies?

"If doctors had 100% of people on the donor list you wouldn't have one person waiting for a transplant so just register," Caroline said.

"So many people assume it's still on their licence. Organ donation used to be on your licence, you'd tick a box but it's not there any more.

"You could save 10 lives. I don't know who Max got his liver from but they are helping people like him have a better and longer life."

DonateLife Week runs from July 30 - August 6.

Topics:  donatelife week health ipswich max bishop organ donation


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