Ipswich Jets CEO Jason Cubit and players David Fa'alogo and Dane Phillips are donating blood at the Ipswich blood donor centre.
Ipswich Jets CEO Jason Cubit and players David Fa'alogo and Dane Phillips are donating blood at the Ipswich blood donor centre. David Nielsen

Ipswich Jets are bloody legends

WHILE Australia's blood supply typically comes under pressure during the festive season, some of the city's favourite rugby league stars have stepped up to help save lives.

Llewellyn Motors Ipswich Jets Club CEO Jason Cubit, along with several of the team's leading players, rolled up their sleeves and donated blood at the Ipswich Blood Donor Centre to give a gift this Christmas which is more powerful than money.

The Jets were happy to sign up to be part of the Australian Red Cross Red25 program, which sees the Red Cross team up with local clubs and organisations to unite on a mission to achieve 25 per cent of Australia's blood donations.

Mr Cubit said the team was happy to help this worthy cause and give life- saving blood.

"The Jets staff and players are happy to be part of the Blood Services Red25 initiative - it's a great way to give back to our community and we'd encourage other businesses, sporting and community groups in Ipswich to do the same,” he said.

"For quite a few of us, it was the first time we had donated so we didn't know what to expect. To be honest, it was a pretty simple process and the nursing staff were excellent.”

SAVING LIVES: Jason Cubit and Sandee Thompson at the Ipswich Blood Donation Centre.
SAVING LIVES: Jason Cubit and Sandee Thompson at the Ipswich Blood Donation Centre. Contributed

Blood service spokesman Sandee Thompson said the short shelf life of blood meant the need was constant.

"The need for blood never goes away, which is why support from local businesses, sporting and community groups like the Llewellyn Motors Ipswich Jets is so important,” she said.

"In Ipswich alone, we need 1450 donations of whole blood and plasma between now and January 7 just to meet patient demand.

Red cells from blood are used in the following ways:

2 per cent trauma, including road accidents.

4 per cent for obstetrics, including pregnant women, new mothers and young children.

10 per cent orthopaedic patients, including fractures and joint replacements.

13 per cent for medical problems including heart/ stomach/kidney disease.

18 per cent for surgical patients including open heart surgery and burns.

19 per cent for other causes of anaemia.

34 per cent for cancer and blood diseases.


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