Ipswich father used children as 'pawns' in stalking

AN IPSWICH father who used his three children as "pawns" in a bitter dispute with his ex-partner has been released on parole.

The 32-year-old, who cannot be named to protect the identity of his family, went to the children's school and told them he would burn their house down in a "disgraceful" stalking attack on their mother.

In sentencing in Ipswich District Court yesterday, Crown prosecutor Ben Jackson said the man's love for his children was not in question but said he had used them to attack their mother.

"This is not a court of morals so I will make no submission as to the defendant's love for his children but in matters like this the children end up becoming pawns," Mr Jackson said.

"There are two people in the world who would have the best interest of their children at heart, their mother and father, but the defendant did not."

The man pleaded guilty to stalking and a string of summary offences including stealing $300 worth of clothes form a Brisbane department store and driving a stolen car with false plates.

He was sentenced to two years' imprisonment with immediate parole after serving pre-sentence custody.

He was also given a restraining order.

Topics:  ipswich ipswich court ipswich crime

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