History museum gets a mural makeover

Owen Cavanagh works on his latest mural at the Nambour Historical Museum, which depicts the sugar cane industry.
Owen Cavanagh works on his latest mural at the Nambour Historical Museum, which depicts the sugar cane industry. John McCutcheon

THE Nambour Historical Museum houses many items as old as the town itself, but now it is also home to a brand new addition.

Artist Owen Cavanagh spent three days last week painting a colourful, larger-than-life mural on the museum's shed.

The artwork depicts the region's well-known historic cane industry.

Mr Cavanagh said he had painted a number of large-scale murals at various locations around the Coast.

"It's definitely more challenging to get the perspective and everything correct; everything is on a bigger scale,” he said.

"It is nice though. I like being outdoors... it's good to get out of the studio and enjoy the gorgeous days we've been having.

"I grew up on the Sunshine Coast and have seen a lot of cane fires and harvesters in that time. I actually went to high school in Nambour back when the mill was in full flight.”

Museum Association secretary Steve Brinkley said he hoped the mural would capture the attention of the public.

"We saw an article about another one (Owen) had done, and that triggered an idea for us to get one painted on the side of our shed,” he said.

"(It's) on the wall facing Coles so anybody at the Coles car park will be able to see it and we're hoping that will attract interest in the museum.

"It would definitely be nice for more to be involved. We understand people are busy, but it would be nice to see some younger people take more interest.”

The Nambour and District Historical Museum is at 18 Mitchell St, Nambour.

Topics:  art mural nambour owen cavanagh

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