Google plans to give music fans all access

GOOGLE has unveiled a streaming music service called All Access that blends songs users have already uploaded to their online libraries with millions of other tracks for a $US10 monthly fee.

The service puts the internet goliath in competition with popular paid subscription plans like Spotify and Rhapsody and free music services like Pandora.

The announcement at Google's annual developers conference in San Francisco kicks off a wave of developments in the digital music space that are expected to entice consumers with ways to listen to music on a range of devices.

Rival Apple is expected to debut a digital radio service later this year; Google-owned YouTube is also working on a paid subscription music plan; and Sweden's Spotify is exploring a way to make a version of its paid streaming plan free with ads on mobile devices. Google is playing catch-up in the digital music space after launching its music store in November 2011.

Apple's iTunes Store, which launched in 2003, is the leader in song downloads and Spotify claims about six million paying subscribers worldwide.

All Access is only available in the US but it is expected to roll out soon in 12 other countries where Google currently sells music, including Australia.


Man killed after being charged by bull

Man killed after being charged by bull

Man charged by bull on Scenic Rim property

Police hunt juveniles for home invasion

Police hunt juveniles for home invasion

The group comprised about eight boys and girls.

Concerning number of drug drivers caught in highway blitz

Concerning number of drug drivers caught in highway blitz

Spreading the road safety message was priority for police

Local Partners