Bashed with a baseball bat - Police and ambulanced attended to a bashing victim at Peppers resort, Urangan.
Bashed with a baseball bat - Police and ambulanced attended to a bashing victim at Peppers resort, Urangan. Valerie Horton

First aid going to schools

ABOUT 300 Australian children under the age of 14 are killed and another 60,000 admitted to hospital following accidents each year.

The main causes of unintentional child injuries include driveway run-overs, crush injuries, strangulation and suffocation, unsafe sleeping environments and drowning.

The frightening statistics have led St John Ambulance's Queensland division to offer free first-aid training to primary school students.

The First Aid in Schools program involves a St John Ambulance trainer attending a school to teach students about first aid, and offers teachers and principals free online school resources.

"Teaching children as young as five years of age first-aid basics such as looking for danger, staying safe and how to call for an ambulance can really mean the difference between a life saved and a life lost," program manager John Parr said.

"In the home, if mum or dad were to collapse and fall unconscious, children need to know what to do. Simply knowing how to call triple zero for an ambulance and knowing their home address, or being able to place someone in the recovery position means the casualty has the best chance of survival."


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