Daughter of army officer in grip of addiction

THE grip of methamphetamine was so strong on a Coast woman's life, she developed her own drug lab to feed her addiction.

A drug user at 14 and an addict by 17, Leigh Michelle Henley, 45, would save up packets of pseudoephedrine prescribed to her until she had enough for a "cook".

Her drug lab was discovered by police in May 2016 when officers were searching a home for another matter and found 0.03g of meth, two bowls of hash and lab items, a court heard.

Just three months later another search uncovered iodine and phosphorus, a condenser, drug utensils, marijuana.

During police interviews, Henley told the court it took her about four to five hours to produce one to two grams of methamphetamine which she would then divide up so she could monitor her usage.

Henley was today sentenced in Maroochydore District Court after pleading guilty to nine drug charges including three counts of possessing dangerous drugs and possessing a relevant thing, two counts of possession of thing used in a crime and one count of producing dangerous drugs.

The daughter of an army officer, Henley moved around the country throughout her childhood and has criminal history in Western Australia, the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory.

She made efforts to get an online education, studying subjects of criminal justice, psychology and academic literacy before dropping out due to homelessness in 2015.

Henley was placed on probation in May for breaching bail and attempted stealing, but failed to respond to the intervention.

Judge Gary Long sentenced Henley to 18 months' imprisonment for the production charge and six months for each remaining charge with a parole release date of March 22, 2018.

Topics:  court crime drugs maroochydore district court meth lab

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Big problem with new pension pay rise

Retirees receive a slight pension boost from this month.

Pensioners will receive an extra $13.20 a fortnight from this month

Donations flood into storm ravaged regions

Amanda Lindh at Murwillumbah Community Centre. Thanks to News Corp, Givit and the Red Cross, the centre will soon be re-opening its food pantry. The pantry was destroyed by flooding in the wake of Cyclone Debbie.

12 months later, Cyclone Debbie's impact still felt

Debbie the second most costly cyclone in Australia's history

The Insurance Council of Australia says the cost of Debbie's damage is second only to Cyclone Tracy which devastated Darwin in December, 1974.

$1.71 billion to fix damage from Townsville to Lismore

Local Partners