News

Science key to global food future

SCIENCE will be the key to feeding the global population as demand for food begins to outstrip supply, the head of an international agricultural group said in Canberra on Tuesday.

Dr Frank Rijsberman, chief executive of international agriculture research group CGIAR, said science drove the green revolution in developing new varieties of wheat and rise in the 1960s and 70s, and science would be needed to drive a similar boom in food production.

He said any future boom in food production would have to come from existing land already being used for agriculture.

"It wasn't just poor countries and farmers that benefited from the step-change through science," he said.

"Australia ranks among the top 10 wheat-producing countries in the world and 98% of the area sown to wheat in Australia uses varieties developed by CIMMYT, estimated to have increased the value of outputs from the Australian wheat industry by at least $750 million," he said.

In terms of the developing world, Dr Rijsberman said agricultural science was already having a powerful impact, in many cases with Australia's help, and more could be done.

"Each year, we add another 75 million or so people to our planet, most residing in the developing world, especially in Asia and Africa. To feed all those people, we will need to increase food production by 70%," he said.

"So we have to use the land more productively and judiciously."

Dr Rijsberman said much of the additional food would have to be grown by small-scale farmers in developing countries, where poverty means such people spend 80% to 90% of their household budget on food alone, and people were more vulnerable to price rises.

He said in light of the combined effect of rising populations, climate change and less land available to grow food, commitment was needed from the whole globe to increase food production.

Topics:  agriculture, farming, food, population, science, wheat


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Images of our shameful past

FOUND: Wade Thompson and Henry Thompson Jr at the Deebing Creek Mission Cemetery.

Images of our shameful past

Show out to deliver the thrills

The Safari Zoo is expected to be a big attraction for the kids.

Show out to deliver the thrills s

Aged care workforce in crisis

Shayne Neumann delivers flags to Bruce and Margaret Dobbie, Darryl Tocchetti and Penny Palmer.

Aged care workforce in crisis

Latest deals and offers

Motorist left hanging off bridge after car crash

A MAN has escaped injury after a crash left him trapped in his car hanging off the edge of a bridge in what police described as a very "precarious situation".

Asylum seeker guilty of indecency for the second time

Ipswich Police Station and Courthouse. Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times

ASYLUM seeker likely to be deported to Pakistan

Man accused of strangling partner

Woman choked and threatened with knife

Hoax bomb was jerry can with mobile phone attached

Leigh David Slegers, 19, pleaded guilty on Friday in Ipswich District Court to three offences.

Man facing charges for scare at Eastern Heights

Walker hails Johnathan Thurston as the 'great competitor'

ULTIMATE COMPETITOR: Cowboys maestro Johnathan Thurston competes on every play in every game... every year.

The plaudits keep coming thick and fast for JT

Sale nears on last large block of land in Coolum

The 43.37ha property on South Coolum Rd has sold.

South Coolum Rd property to be land banked

Caloundra’s former Centrepoint Buffet site up for sale

FOR SALE: The home of the old Centrepoint Buffet

Restaurant fined for unhygienic practices closed months ago